Reimagining Care/Work Policies

Team

We are a cross-sectoral and cross-generational powerhouse team that combines wide and highly divergent expertise and approaches to research and policy analysis. We are academics and researchers, activists, policy advocates and experts, and members of government departments and charitable, non-profit, and union organizations. We are all passionately committed to debating and finding the optimal mix of care and work policies for diverse families living in Canada.

Project Leader

Andrea Doucet

Andrea Doucet

Andrea Doucet is the Project Director and Principal Investigator of this Partnership program.  She has published widely on care/work practices and responsibilities, fathering, parental leave policies, feminist and ecological onto-epistemologies, narrative analysis, research ethics, and genealogies of concepts. She is a Canada Research Chair in Gender, Work, and Care, Professor in the Department of Sociology and Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies at Brock University and Adjunct Research Professor in Sociology at Carleton University and the University of Victoria. Andrea is the Co-Coordinator of the International Network of Leave Policies and Research (2021-2026) and Director of the Research Studio for Narrative, Visual and Digital Methods.

You can learn more about her work at andreadoucet.com and https://brocku.ca/research-studio/

Co-Founding Team

Andrea Doucet

Andrea Doucet

Andrea Doucet is the Project Director and Principal Investigator of this Partnership program.  She has published widely on care/work practices and responsibilities, fathering, parental leave policies, feminist and ecological onto-epistemologies, narrative analysis, research ethics, and genealogies of concepts. She is a Canada Research Chair in Gender, Work, and Care, Professor in the Department of Sociology and Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies at Brock University and Adjunct Research Professor in Sociology at Carleton University and the University of Victoria. Andrea is the Co-Coordinator of the International Network of Leave Policies and Research (2021-2026) and Director of the Research Studio for Narrative, Visual and Digital Methods.

You can learn more about her work at andreadoucet.com and https://brocku.ca/research-studio/

Martha Friendly

Martha Friendly

Martha Friendly is the founder and executive director of the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU), an independent childcare policy research institute. Martha has worked on childcare research for more than 40 years, collaborating with the community sector, researchers and policy makers. She has substantial expertise in childcare and family policy in Canada and internationally, publishing extensively in academic, technical and popular venues and authoring two books on childcare policy. Martha has been awarded a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee medal and an honourary doctorate from Trent University recognizing her contributions to Canadian childcare and has been a member of many advisory groups such as the current federal childcare minister’s Expert Panel on Early Learning and Child Care.

Donna Lero

Donna Lero

Donna Lero is University Professor Emeritus, Department of Family Relations & Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.  She was the Inaugural Jarislowsky Chair in Families and Work and co-founded the University’s Centre for Families, Work and Well-Being. Her interests include work-family policies and practices; the relationship between care, gender and employment; parental leave policy design and impacts; and early childhood education and care policies and programs.

Susan Prentice

Susan Prentice

Susan Prentice is Duff Roblin Professor of Government at the University of Manitoba, where she began her career as Margaret Laurence Chair in Women’s Studies. Her whole academic career has focussed on care, gender, and families, with a primary specialization in historical and contemporary childcare policy. She practices public sociology,  and has a long track record of engagement with childcare advocacy organizations and community-based women’s groups.

Project Manager

Jennifer Turner

Project Manager

Jennifer Turner

Project Manager

Jennifer Turner is the Project Manager of this partnership project. Before stepping into this role, she worked with Andrea Doucet for six years as her Canada Research Chair Project Coordinator and assisted Andrea and the research team in securing the funding for this project. Jennifer is a mom of two young boys with a vested interest in this project as she is currently living through these care/work policies. Jennifer is hopeful that this project will inform change around parental leave policies allowing for improved access, flexibility, and a higher wage replacement, along with high quality, affordable, and inclusive childcare. 

Team Directory

Name Project Role(s) Institution/Organization
Andrea Doucet
Project Director
Principal Investigator
Co-Founding Team
Steering Committee Member
Parental Leave Cluster Leader
Brock University
Martha Friendly
Co-Founding Team
Steering Committee Member
Childcare Cluster Leader
Co-Investigator
Childcare Resource and Research Unit
Donna Lero
Co-Founding Team
Steering Committee Member
Employment Cluster Leader
Co-Investigator
University of Guelph
Susan Prentice
Co-Founding Team
Steering Committee Member
Childcare Cluster Leader
Co-Investigator
University of Manitoba
Sylvia Fuller
Steering Committee Member
Employment Cluster Leader
Co-Investigator
University of British Columbia
Sophie Mathieu
Steering Committee Member
Parental Leave Cluster Leader
Co-Investigator
Vanier Institute of the Family
Lindsey McKay
Steering Committee Member
Parental Leave Cluster Leader
Co-Investigator
Thompson Rivers University
Vanessa Watts
Steering Committee Member
Co-Investigator
McMaster University
Jennifer Turner
Project Manager Brock University
Ashley Do Nascimento
Knowledge Mobilization Coordinator University of Western Ontario
Kim de Laat
Co-Investigator University of Waterloo
Jennifer Adese
Co-Investigator University of Toronto
Stephanie Bernstein
Co-Investigator University of Montréal
Irene Boeckmann
Co-Investigator University of Toronto
Gordon Cleveland
Co-Investigator University of Toronto
Patricia Douglas
Co-Investigator Brandon University
Ann-Zofie Duvander
Co-Investigator Stockholm University
Karen Foster
Co-Investigator Dalhousie University
Margaret Gibson
Co-Investigator University of Waterloo
Christa Japel
Co-Investigator University of Montréal
Eva Jewell
Co-Investigator Toronto Metropolitan University
Janna Klostermann
Co-Investigator University of Calgary
Kathleen Lahey
Co-Investigator Queens University
Rachel Margolis
Co-Investigator University of Western Ontario
Melissa Milkie
Co-Investigator University of Toronto
Lisa Pasolli
Co-Investigator Queens University
Francesca Petrella
Co-Investigator Aix-Marseille University
Yue Qian
Co-Investigator University of British Columbia
Brooke Richardson
Co-Investigator Brock University
Jennifer Robson
Co-Investigator Carleton University
Carol Rowan
Co-Investigator University of Prince Edward Island
Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay
Co-Investigator Université Téluq
Linda White
Co-Investigator University of Toronto
Tricia van Rhijn
Co-Investigator University of Guelph
Kate Bezanson
Collaborator Brock University
Laura Addati
Collaborator International Labour Organization
Marian Baird
Collaborator University of Sydney
Morna Ballantyne
Collaborator Child Care Now
Shellie Bird
Collaborator Canadian Union of Postal Workers
Mareike Buenning
Collaborator WZB Berlin Social Science Center
Jonathan Dewar
Collaborator First Nations Information Governance Centre
Leanne Findlay
Collaborator Statistics Canada
Margo Greenwood
Collaborator University of Northern British Columbia
Lena Hipp
Collaborator WZB Berlin Social Science Center
Helene Klodawsky
Collaborator Independent Film Maker
Dafna Kohen
Collaborator Statistics Canada
David MacDonald
Collaborator Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Angella MacEwen
Collaborator CUPE
Rianne Mahon
Collaborator Carleton University
Peter Moss
Collaborator University College London
Albert Motivans
Collaborator Equal Measures 2030
Margaret O’Brien
Collaborator University College London
Kate Paterson
Collaborator Kepaterson Consulting
Tine Rostgaard
Collaborator Stockholm University
Katherine Scott
Collaborator Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Victoria Smallman
Collaborator Canadian Labour Congress
Lisa Smylie
Collaborator Department for Women and Gender Equality, Canada
Olivier Thevenon
Collaborator Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development
Yalnizyan
Armine Yalnizyan
Collaborator Atkinson Foundation
Sadie Goddard-Durant
Research Associate Brock University
bridget
Research Associate University of Waterloo
Henry Stine
Student Dalhousie University
Marco Sasso
Student Brock University
Christina Treleaven
Student University of British Columbia
Laura Fisher
Student Dalhousie University
Umay Kader
Student University of British Columbia
Jenna Cooper
Student University of Waterloo
Brianna Urquhart
Student University of Waterloo
Manlin (Monica) Cai
Student University of British Columbia
Megan Coghill
Student University of Guelph
Jessica Falk
Student Niagara University
Alyssa Gerhardt
Student Dalhousie University
Trina McKellep
Student University of Manitoba
Rachel McLay
Student Dalhousie University
Siqi (Rebecca) Qin
Student University of British Columbia
Kenya Thompson
Student Carleton University
Helena Tizza
Student Brock University
Kailin Rourke
Research Assistant Brock University
Mireille Chaumont-Goneau
Research Assistant University of Montréal

Andrea Doucet

Andrea Doucet is the Project Director and Principal Investigator of this Partnership program.  She has published widely on care/work practices and responsibilities, fathering, parental leave policies, feminist and ecological onto-epistemologies, narrative analysis, research ethics, and genealogies of concepts. She is a Canada Research Chair in Gender, Work, and Care, Professor in the Department of Sociology and Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies at Brock University and Adjunct Research Professor in Sociology at Carleton University and the University of Victoria. Andrea is the Co-Coordinator of the International Network of Leave Policies and Research (2021-2026) and Director of the Research Studio for Narrative, Visual and Digital Methods.

You can learn more about her work at andreadoucet.com and https://brocku.ca/research-studio/

Martha Friendly

Martha Friendly is the founder and executive director of the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU), an independent childcare policy research institute. Martha has worked on childcare research for more than 40 years, collaborating with the community sector, researchers and policy makers. She has substantial expertise in childcare and family policy in Canada and internationally, publishing extensively in academic, technical and popular venues and authoring two books on childcare policy. Martha has been awarded a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee medal and an honourary doctorate from Trent University recognizing her contributions to Canadian childcare and has been a member of many advisory groups such as the current federal childcare minister’s Expert Panel on Early Learning and Child Care.

Donna Lero

Donna Lero is University Professor Emeritus, Department of Family Relations & Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.  She was the Inaugural Jarislowsky Chair in Families and Work and co-founded the University’s Centre for Families, Work and Well-Being. Her interests include work-family policies and practices; the relationship between care, gender and employment; parental leave policy design and impacts; and early childhood education and care policies and programs.

Susan Prentice

Susan Prentice is Duff Roblin Professor of Government at the University of Manitoba, where she began her career as Margaret Laurence Chair in Women’s Studies. Her whole academic career has focussed on care, gender, and families, with a primary specialization in historical and contemporary childcare policy. She practices public sociology,  and has a long track record of engagement with childcare advocacy organizations and community-based women’s groups.

Sylvia Fuller

Sylvia Fuller is Professor of Sociology at the University of British Columbia, and Academic Director of the British Columbia Research Data Centres Network. Her research focuses on understanding how labor market inequalities develop and erode, intersections of paid and unpaid work, and the implications of changing employment relations, household dynamics, and social policy for people’s economic security and mobility.

Sophie Mathieu

Sophie Mathieu is the Senior program specialist at the Vanier Institute of the Family, where she is responsible for building partnerships with different organizations, researchers, advocates and policy makers with an interest on family wellbeing. Dr. Mathieu holds a PhD in sociology and she is an expert on gender inequality, Québec family policy, childcare and parental benefits. She has published numerous academic papers in French and English both nationally and internationally on the “demotherization” of care work, the transformation of the Québec childcare model and on inequality in the uptake of parental benefits in Québec. Sophie is strongly committed to the process of knowledge mobilization to wide audiences, and she has published more than 15 op-eds on childcare and parental benefits since 2020. Dr. Mathieu is a member of all three research clusters.  

Lindsey McKay

Lindsey McKay is an Assistant Teaching Professor in Sociology at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, British Columbia. She is a feminist sociologist/political economist of care work, health and medicine. Equity is a central theme in her research and approach to teaching. 

Vanessa Watts

Vanessa Watts is Mohawk and Anishinaabe Bear Clan, Six Nations of the Grand River.  She is an assistant professor of Indigenous Studies and Sociology at McMaster University, and holds the Paul R. MacPherson Chair in Indigenous Studies. Her research examines Indigenist epistemological and ontological interventions on place-based, material knowledge production. Vanessa is particularly interested in Indigenous feminisms, sociology of knowledge, Indigenous governance, and other-than-human relations as forms of Indigenous ways of knowing. Vanessa’s SSHRC Insight Development Grant for her project “An Indigenist Sociology of Knowledge: Indigenous social lives in Indigenous studies, sociology and political science (1895 and beyond).” The project interrogates over a century of representations of Indigenous peoples in sociology and political science.

Jennifer Turner

Project Manager

Jennifer Turner is the Project Manager of this partnership project. Before stepping into this role, she worked with Andrea Doucet for six years as her Canada Research Chair Project Coordinator and assisted Andrea and the research team in securing the funding for this project. Jennifer is a mom of two young boys with a vested interest in this project as she is currently living through these care/work policies. Jennifer is hopeful that this project will inform change around parental leave policies allowing for improved access, flexibility, and a higher wage replacement, along with high quality, affordable, and inclusive childcare. 

Ashley Do Nascimento

KMB Coordinator

Ashley Do Nascimento is the Knowledge Mobilization Coordinator.

Ashley is currently a PhD student in the Faculty of Education at the University of Western Ontario. Her current research focuses on the colonial intersections of race, class and gender and their implications in the relationship between a group of young girls and the toxic water in their community. Thinking through intersectionality and given her past research experiences working with children and families in the favelas (slums) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Ashley brings her expertise to the Families Stories, Family Policies project.

Kim de Laat

Kim de Laat is an Assistant Professor of Organization and Human Behaviour at the University of Waterloo’s Stratford School of Interaction Design and Business. She received her PhD in Sociology from the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the Stratford School, she completed a SSHRC postdoctoral fellowship at the Institute for Gender and the Economy, University of Toronto, and a Mitacs postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Doucet at the Vanier Institute of the Family and the Department of Sociology, Brock University.

As a sociologist of work and culture, Kim is interested in how culture and work design shape inequality in organizational and creative contexts. In addition to her work with Dr. Doucet, she has two ongoing projects concerning the unintended consequences of formal and informal social policies aimed at reducing workplace inequalities; one focuses on gendered differences in the uptake of flexible work arrangements, and the other focuses on diversity initiatives in the music industry. Her work, supported by grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, appears in such outlets as Feminist Formations, ILR Review, Journal of Gender Studies, Poetics, Socio-Economic Review, and Work and Occupations, among others, as well as in op-eds for the Globe & Mail, and Policy Options. 

Jennifer Adese

Jennifer Adese (Otipemisiwak/Métis) is a Canada Research Chair in Métis Women, Politics, and Community and an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM). She is the co-editor (with Robert Alexander Innes) of Indigenous Celebrity: Entanglements with Fame (University of Manitoba Press) and of A People and a Nation: New Directions in Contemporary Métis Studies (with Chris Andersen) from UBC Press. She is the author of a number of articles and book chapters on Métis literature, Indigenous visual sovereignty, and Indigenous-Canada relations.

Stephanie Bernstein

Stephanie Bernstein has been a professor at the Law Department of the Université du Québec à Montréal since 2003, where she teaches national, international and comparative labour law. Her research focuses on the working conditions and legal rights of paid care workers, work-family conflict and, more generally, on the regulation of precarious work. She has participated in a number of interdisciplinary research teams engaged in collaborative and participatory research with community and union organizations. She is a member of CINBIOSE, SAGE : Équipe de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le travail Santé-Genre-Égalité and the Interuniversity Research Centre on Globalization and Work (CRIMT).

Irene Boeckmann

Gordon Cleveland

Gordon Cleveland is Associate Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Toronto Scarborough.  He studies early learning and child care policies and their impacts on children and families. He has written extensively about these subjects in academic and popular journals, books and magazines. He has recently been a member of the Expert Panel of Early Learning and Child Care Data and Research.   In 2018, he was the main author of a widely acclaimed report to the Ontario Ministry of Education that recommended the provision of free child care services to children of preschool age as the next step to improve affordability of early education and care.  He comments frequently on public policy issues in relation to early learning and child care.

Patricia Douglas

Patty Douglas is an Associate Professor of Disability Studies in the Faculty of Education at Brandon University. Her work concentrates on critical and creative approaches to education, care and disability as supported by feminist, queer, decolonial, critical post-humanist and other approaches that dislodge the (humanist) human. Douglas is Co-investigator on the SSHRC Partnership Grant Reimagining Care/Work Policies where she will be exploring disability, family, work and care. Douglas also leads Re•Storying Autism, a multimedia storytelling project challenging deficit-based stereotypes of autism. She is a former special education teacher and mother to two sons, one of whom attracted the label of autism. See www.restoryingautism.ca. @ReStorying

Ann-Zofie Duvander

Ann-Zofie Duvander is Professor of Sociology at Mid University and Professor of Demography at Stockholm University. Her research interests include family policy and her main research is on parental leave use in Sweden. She has studied parental leave use for various groups of parents and changes over time. She has been involved in reform evaluations, notably the effects of the introduction of the daddy months in Sweden and in the other Nordic countries. She has also studied income trajectories in couples following childbirth. Recently she has been involved in research on economic responsibility over children after a separation.

Karen Foster

Dr. Foster is a sociologist whose research and writing spans the sociology of work, rural sociology, political economy and historical sociology. She has drawn on both qualitative and quantitative methods to study economic issues from a sociological perspective: occupational succession in rural family businesses, farm labour, housing desires among rural and urban young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder, local economic development, the history of productivity as a statistic and a concept, generational divisions at work, young peoples’ experiences on social assistance, and youth outmigration from rural communities. She teaches the sociology of work, gender and work, social research methods, and rural sociology in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at Dalhousie University, where she holds the Canada Research Chair in Sustainable Rural Futures for Atlantic Canada and directs the Rural Futures Research Centre.

Margaret Gibson

Margaret F. (Meg) Gibson is an assistant professor in social work and social development studies at Renison University College, University of Waterloo, Canada. Her scholarship focuses on 2SLGBTQI+ parenting, disability studies, social services, and feminist research methods. Meg was the collection editor for Queering Motherhood: Narrative and Theoretical Perspectives (Demeter Press, 2014), and she is currently leading a project about neurodiversity in practice, family, and identity. She enjoys spending time with her wife, two teens, tuxedo cat, and puggle.

Christa Japel

Eva Jewell

Dr. Eva Jewell (Ma’iingan Dodem, she/her) is Anishinaabekwe from Deshkan Ziibiing (Chippewas of the Thames First Nation) in southwestern Ontario. Her scholarship supports community-based/community-led inquiry on topics of governance, kinships, care, and reclamation amongst Anishinaabeg as well as within her First Nation. Dr. Jewell is currently an Assistant Professor in Indigenous Feminisms in the Sociology Department at Ryerson University, and an Associate Fellow at the Yellowhead Institute.

Janna Klostermann

Janna Klostermann is a feminist sociologist exploring the politics of care through narrative, ethnographic and arts-based research. “What about the limits of care?” is a question central to her work. She is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Calgary.

Kathleen Lahey

Rachel Margolis

Rachel Margolis is a demographer and sociologist in the department of sociology at the University of Western Ontario. Her research focuses on how families are changing and why. Her work related to the partnership grant addresses how Canadian parental benefits policies are used differently by high and low income families, and how policies affect family stability, income, and wellbeing over time.

Melissa Milkie

Melissa A. Milkie is Professor & Graduate Chair of Sociology at the University of Toronto, and President of the Work-Family Researchers Network. An author of the award-winning Changing Rhythms of American Family Life, her research centers on links among gender, work-family strains and well-being. With a unique focus on time and gendered culture, she identifies social forces linked to mothering and fathering across era and region. Current projects include analyzing paradoxes of parents’ time use; trends, ethnic variations, and cross-cultural patterns of parents’ paid and unpaid labor and leisure time; multi-level buffers of work-life conflicts, and parental strains among Syrian refugee mothers. Her research has been supported by SSHRC-Canada and the U.S.-NIH.

Lisa Pasolli

Lisa Pasolli is an Assistant Professor of History at Queen’s University. Her work examines the history of women, gender, social policy, and child care in 20th century Canada. Among her publications is the book Working Mothers and the Child Care Dilemma: A History of British Columbia’s Social Policy (UBC Press, 2015). Her current project, which is made possible by the wonderful ECEs at her son’s unionized child care centre, explores the history of child care and taxation in postwar Canada.

Francesca Petrella

Francesca Petrella is Professor of Economics at Aix-Marseille University in France, and a researcher at the Institute of Labor Economics and Industrial Sociology (LEST), where she co-leads the MA program on the management of third sector organisations. A member of several national and international research networks (including EMES, CIRIEC, RIUESS), she specializes in the social economy of France and Europe. A major focus of her work is childcare (especially in terms of governance, new public policies and instruments, and the privatization and commercialization of care).

Yue Qian

Yue Qian is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of British Columbia. Her research interests focus on family, gender, and demography. Her current research examines how gender intersects with family and population processes (e.g., assortative mating, divisions of labor, and parenthood) to shape individual wellbeing and social inequality in East Asia and North America. Most recently, she has been doing international research to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on work/family and mental health. Her research has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Journal of Marriage and Family, and Social Science & Medicine, among others.

Brooke Richardson

Brooke Richardson is an Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Sociology at Brock University, lecturer in the Department of Early Childhood Studies at Ryerson University and current President of the Association of Early Childhood Educators of Ontario. Brooke has published and presented nationally and internationally on topics related to social policy (childcare, child welfare) and Canadian children/families. Her current work problematizes the increasing privatization of the care while exploring alternative possibilities offered through a feminist, ethics of care framework. She is currently working on two edited anthologies: Mothering on the edge: A critical examination of mothering within the child protection system (Demeter Press) and The Early Childhood Educator: Critical Conversations in Feminist Theory (Bloosmbury).

Jennifer Robson

Jennifer Robson is an Associate Professor of Political Management at Kroeger College, Carleton University, where she teaches courses in public policy and research methods  Prior to joining Carleton, Jennifer worked in the Government of Canada and she spent nearly a decade in the voluntary sector holding senior roles in policy development and research. Her research has included studies of social policies such as family benefits, education savings, poverty in Canada, wealth inequality, tax policy and the financial lives of low and modest income persons.

Carol Rowan

Mary Caroline Rowan has spent the last forty years travelling and working between Inuit Nunangat and Montreal, Quebec. Her interest is in living Inuit ways of knowing and being through pedagogy and curriculum, in places where young children and families are engaged. The trail has involved working in communities with Elders, parents’ children and teachers. This work has led to the construction of child care centres, the adoption of policy, the development of organizational manuals, and the creation of curricula. It has involved teacher/parent education, the making of Inuktitut language children’s books, the assembling of learning stories and a proposal to adopt Nunangat pedagogies as strategy to think with land, snow and ice.

Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay

Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay is professor of labour economics, innovation and human resources  management at the université Téluq of the University of Québec, Canada; she has been appointed Canada Research Chair on the socio-economic challenges of the Knowledge Economy in 2002 (http://www.teluq..ca/chaireecosavoir/) and again in 2009-2016, and appointed director of a CURA (Community-University Research Alliance) on the management of social times and work-life balance in 2009 (www.teluq.ca/aruc-gats).

In recent years, she has been invited professor at Université de Paris I, Sorbonne, Université of Lille I, ofAngers, of Toulouse, of Lille I and of Lyon 3, Louvain-la-Neuve, HEC and Liège universities, in Belgium, University of social sciences of Hanoi (Vietnam) and the European School of Management.

She has published many books, amongst which a Labour Economics textbook, a Sociology of Work textbook, an Innovation textbook, three books on Working time and work-life balance issues and he  has published in various international journals.

Linda White

Linda White is the RBC Chair in Economic and Public Policy and a Professor of Political Science and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. Her areas of research include comparative welfare states, comparative social and family policy, particularly education, early childhood education and care, and maternity and parental leave; gender and public policy; ideas, norms, and public policy development; and federalism, law and public policy.  She is the author, most recently, of Constructing Policy Change: Early Childhood Education and Care in Liberal Welfare States (UTP, 2017), among other co-authored and co-edited books.

Tricia van Rhijn

Tricia van Rhijn (PhD, RECE) is an Associate Professor of Family Relations and Human Development in the Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition at the University of Guelph. She is an interdisciplinary social scientist and Registered Early Childhood Educator whose research interests include parent-child relationships, child development, early childhood education and care, child and family well-being, family relations, and various aspects of work-life integration (as well as school-life or school-work-life integration). Much of her research focuses on policy- and practice-based considerations and applications.

Kate Bezanson

Dr. Kate Bezanson, BA (Trent), MA (York), PhD (York), LLM (Osgoode Hall Law School) is Associate Dean (Faculty of Social Sciences, Brock University), Associate Professor (Sociology, Brock University), Faculty Research Fellow at the Institute for Gender and the Economy (GATE) at the Rotman School of Management (University of Toronto), faculty affiliate with the MA in Critical Sociology and the MA in Social Justice and Equity Studies programmes (Brock University), and is associated graduate faculty in the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (Wilfrid Laurier University). She works in the areas of social and family policy, gender, social reproduction/care, constitutional law, political economy, and federalism.

Laura Addati

Marian Baird

Marian Baird is Professor of Gender and Employment Relations, a Presiding Pro-Chancellor of the University of Sydney, Head of the Discipline of Work and Organisational Studies, and Co-Director of the Women and Work Research Group at the University of Sydney Business School. Marian was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2016 for outstanding services to improving the quality of women’s working lives and for contributions to tertiary education. She is one of Australia’s leading researchers in the fields of women, work and family.

Marian’s research was instrumental in the development of Australia’s paid parental leave scheme, introduced in 2010, and she was a Chief Investigator on the review panel of the scheme from 2010 to 2014. She has contributed to a number of government enquiries relating to parental leave, gender equality and sexual harassment in the workplace. She is now Co-Convenor of the International Parental leave Network and is currently a Chief Investigator on the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence on Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), where her focus is on mature workers, particularly with regard to women and care.

Morna Ballantyne

Morna Ballantyne is the Executive Director of Child Care Now, Canada’s national child care advocacy organization. Now a grandmother, she began advocating forty years ago for more high quality, affordable, inclusive, affordable licensed child care. She works with others to press governments to build a publicly managed and publicly funded Canada-wide system of early learning and child care. Morna serves on the Government of Canada’s Task Force on Women in the Economy, and was a member of the federal Expert Panel on Early Learning and Child Care Data and Research until it completed its mandate.

Shellie Bird

Shellie Bird is a mother and grandmother and came into childcare advocacy by serving on the Board of Directors of her son’s childcare centre.

Shellie was an early childhood educator for more than twenty years working with infants and toddlers attending Centretown Parent’s Day, a non-profit centre in downtown Ottawa.Shellie became active in her union as an advocate for early learning and childcare and has led numerous campaigns to improve the working conditions of early childhood educators. Today she works for the Canadian Union of Postal Workers as the National Child Care Coordinator and is a sitting member of the National Child Care Working Group of the Canadian Union of Public Employees, and as a board member of Child Care Now.

Mareike Buenning

Mareike Bünning is Senior Researcher at the German Center of Gerontology. Her research focuses on inequalities in the division of paid and care work and its consequences for the careers, family lives and well-being of caregivers. She is particularly interested in how work-family policies at the national and workplace level shape these relationships. Her dissertation titled “Parental leave for fathers – Consequences for men’s work and family lives” received the “Best Dissertation of the Year”-Award from the European Consortium for Sociological Research.

Jonathan Dewar

Leanne Findlay

Leanne Findlay is a Principal Researcher with Statistics Canada. Her areas of expertise are population health data and healthy child development, with a specific interest in the health of vulnerable children and youth. She is also interested in mental health and correlates of positive mental health. Recently, Leanne has been involved in an extensive program of research on early learning and child care, with an emphasis on new data sources to address research gaps and to inform ELCC policy initiatives.

Margo Greenwood

Margo Greenwood, Academic Leader of the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health, is an Indigenous scholar of Cree ancestry. She is also Vice-President of Indigenous Health for the Northern Health Authority in British Columbia and Professor in both the First Nations Studies and Education programs at the University of Northern British Columbia.  Her academic work crosses disciplines and sectors, and focuses on the health and well-being of Indigenous children and families and public health.  Margo has undertaken work with UNICEF, the United Nations, the CCSDH, PHN of Canada, and the CIHR, specifically, the Institute of Population and Public Health.

Lena Hipp

Lena hipp is the head of the research group “Work & Care” at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center (Germany) and professor of social stratification (esp. work and organizations) at the University of Potsdam. She received her PhD at Cornell University back in 2011. Before entering academia, she worked as a policy advisor in the German Parliament. Her current research focuses particularly on social inequality related to care and gender and has been published in journals such as the Journal of Marriage and Family, Social Forces, Socio-Economic Review, European Review of Sociology, and Work and Occupations.

Helene Klodawsky

Canadian independent filmmaker Helene Klodawsky is a passionate storyteller committed to portraying political and social struggles, as well as exploring the documentary art form. Her award winning films, spanning 35 years, are screened, studied and televised around the world. Helene also works as a script consultant, especially with emerging filmmakers.Among Helene’s numerous films, Motherland (1994), Family Motel (2007), Come Worry With Us! (2013), Grassroots in Dry Lands (2015), From Janet With Love (2017), Care Rebels (2017), and The Invisible Everywhere (2019) explore how the work of care is both essential and unrecognized. Helene is in pre-production as director/writer of Stolen Time, a feature documentary on nursing home negligence.

Dafna Kohen

Dr. Dafna Kohen is Assistant Director at the Health Analysis Division at Statistics Canada and Adjunct Professor at the Dept. of Epidemiology and Community Medicine at the University of Ottawa. Dr. Kohen received her training as a developmental psychologist from Columbia University, McMaster, and McGill and held a position previously at UBC. Research areas of expertise include the use of survey and administrative data for policy relevant research related to children, youth, families, and vulnerable populations.

David MacDonald

David Macdonald is a senior economist at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.  Since 2008, he has coordinated the Alternative Federal Budget, which takes a fresh look at the federal budget from a progressive perspective. David has also written on a variety of topics, from income supports during the pandemic to federal tax policy, and he is a regular media commentator on national policy issues.

Angella MacEwen

Rianne Mahon

Rianne Mahon is distinguished research professor with the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University. She has published numerous articles and chapters on industrial policy, labour market restructuring, childcare politics, and the redesign of social policy at the local, national and global scales. Mahon has co-edited numerous books including After 08: Social Policy and the Global Financial Crisis (with G. Boychuk and S. McBride), Achieving the Social Development Goals: Global Governance Challenges (with S. Horton and S. Dalby), and co-authored Advanced Introduction to Social Policy (with D. Béland). Her current work focuses on the gendering of global governance, with a particular focus on transnational care chains.

Peter Moss

Peter Moss is Emeritus Professor of Early Childhood Provision at the Thomas Coram Research Unit, UCL Institute of Education, University College London. His interests include early childhood education and care; the workforce in children’s services; the relationship between care, gender and employment; social pedagogy; and democracy in children’s services. Much of his work over the last 25 years has been cross-national, in particular in Europe. He is co-founder of the International Network on Leave Policies and Research and co-editor of the network’s annual review of leave policies. Recent books include: Neoliberalism and Early Childhood Education (co-authored with Guy Roberts-Holmes); Transforming Early Childhood in England (co-edited with Claire Cameron); Loris Malaguzzi and the Schools of Reggio Emilia (co-edited with a working group from Reggio Emilia); and Alternative Narratives in Early Childhood: an introduction for Students and Practitioners.

Albert Motivans

Margaret O’Brien

Margaret O’Brien is Professor of Child and Family Policy at the Thomas Coram Research Unit, University College London. She is a leading expert on fathers, parental leave and family life with a work-family policy focus. She has recently finished an EU funded project examining inequalities in access to parental leave across the EU-28

A current ESRC project examines COVID-19 recovery, resources and work-care strategies of parents with a child <5years in London. With Prof Ann-Zofie Duvander (University of Stockholm) she was the co-coordinator (2016-2021) of the International Network on Leave Policies and Research, a 45 country infrastructure project.

Kate Paterson

Dr. Kate Paterson is a queer educational consultant based in Calgary, Alberta. She holds a PhD in Educational Studies from the University of British Columbia and a master’s degree in Social Justice and Equity Studies from Brock University. Her work focuses on the intersections of disability theory, decolonial theories, queer, trans, anti-racist and abolitionist perspectives in elementary education. Kate’s expertise is in educational policy and the broader queer/trans necropolitical landscape of public education schooling systems. As a consultant, Kate works with schools and organizations to develop queer and trans affirming practices and competencies. For more information, visit www.kepaterson.com.

Tine Rostgaard

Katherine Scott

Katherine Scott serves as the director for the CCPA’s gender equality and public policy work. She has worked in the community sector as a researcher, writer and advocate over the past 25 years, writing on a range of issues from social policy to inequality to funding for nonprofits. She served as Vice President of Research at the Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD) for several years and has worked with several national organizations such as Prosper Canada, Volunteer Canada, Capacity Canada, Pathways to Education Canada, and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. Katherine is currently working on projects that track the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on women and their future economic security.

Victoria Smallman

Vicky Smallman is the National Director of the Human Rights Department for the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC). A long-time activist on gender equality and human rights issues, Vicky spent more than a decade in the academic labour movement, working primarily with contract academic staff, before joining the CLC in 2010.  She leads a team responsible for the labour movement’s policy, advocacy and campaign work on women’s and human rights, anti-racism, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, Indigenous and disability justice. Vicky has served on the boards of directors of a number of national and Ottawa organizations, including Equal Voice, Child Care Now, and the Somerset West Community Health Centre.  She currently sits on the federal Minister for Women and Gender Equality’s Advisory Council on the Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender‑Based Violence, and is a Community Research Associate at Western University’s Centre for Research and Education on Violence against Women and Children. She has researched and written about academic labour issues, activism and women in Canadian politics.

Lisa Smylie

Olivier Thevenon

Yalnizyan

Armine Yalnizyan

Armine Yalnizyan is the Atkinson Foundation’s Fellow on the Future of Workers. She served as Senior Economic Policy Advisor for the Deputy Minister at Employment and Social Development Canada from 2018 to 2019, and currently serves on Ministers Freeland and Fortier’s Task Group on Women In The Economy. She helped lead the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Inequality Project from 2008 to 2017, and provided weekly business commentaries on CBC radio and CBC TV from 2011 to 2018. She is past President of the Canadian Association for Business Economics.

Sadie Goddard-Durant

Sadie K. Goddard-Durant is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Sociology at Brock University and the Director of Knowledge Mobilization and Research at Luke’s Place, an NGO which provides family law support to women and children after they leave an abusive relationship. Sadie provides strategic guidance and oversight of the delivery of Luke’s Place innovative knowledge mobilization and research programs in Ontario and where applicable, in Canada reflective of their status as a Centre of Excellence.

bridget

bridget (she/her) earned her Master of Arts in Sociology at the University of Waterloo in 2020. Her thesis explored LGBTQIA+ folks’ experiences of mental illness and access to support services, and her general research interests include health studies, qualitative methods, and critical theory. bridget has worked with Dr. Meg Gibson on a project about neurodiversity for the past two years and is excited to focus on queer families and families with disabilities in the Care/Work project. She enjoys spending time bouldering and camping with her partner and toy fox terrier.

Henry Stine

Henry Stine is an MA student in Sociology at Dalhousie University. He completed his undergraduate degree at Quest University Canada, where he became interested in pursuing sociology. Henry has work experience in early education, social research, public health, architecture, and building. Henry has also worked as a teaching assistant in the Sociology department at Dalhousie and is currently writing his MA thesis on the United Nations and its commitments to sustainable development.

Marco Sasso

Marco Sasso holds a Bachelor of Journalism from Toronto Metropolitan University and has been working in the media industry as a producer and editor since 2014. Currently, he is completing his Master of Arts in Critical Sociology at Brock University. His research interests include gender, masculinities, and social policy. He is also currently a member of the RC/W project’s media outputs team.

Christina Treleaven

Christina Treleaven is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of British Columbia. Her research interests center around gender, work, care, and eldercare. Her dissertation, supervised by Dr. Sylvia Fuller, explores how young adult eldercare providers conceptualize care, and how they navigate work and care interfaces both prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Laura Fisher

Laura Fisher is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at Dalhousie University, a graduate of the Master of Arts in Sociology program at Acadia University, as well as a Bachelor of Community Development (Honours) graduate. Her research has spanned topics from welfare reform to family food insecurity to rural families coping during COVID-19, with a strong focus on low-income families. She is also a co-author for the past 3 years of the annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia. She is the 2021 recipient of the Outstanding Master of Arts Research Award from Acadia University.

Umay Kader

Umay Kader is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of British Columbia. Umay completed her bachelor’s degree in Political Science at Bilkent University, and master’s degree in Social Policy at ODTU, Ankara, Türkiye. Her research interests have spanned from welfare state policies focusing on gender, family, and single mothers to food insecurity experienced by families living in Vancouver. Umay also worked at think tanks and NGOs where she had the opportunity to collaborate with local and international stakeholders focusing on improving the lives of refugees. Her dissertation, supervised by Dr. Sylvia Fuller and Dr. Michela Musto, aims to explore and explain the experiences and meaning-making processes of young adults who are currently living with their parent(s) in Metro Vancouver.

Jenna Cooper

Jenna (they/them) holds an Hons. Bachelor of Social Work degree from Lakehead University has been working in the social service field for the past nine years in the areas of mental health, disability, social assistance, and community health.  Currently, they are completing their Masters of Social Work (MSW) degree through University of Waterloo. Jenna’s research interests include 2SLGBTQIA+ families, poverty reduction, body liberation, and community organizing.  They enjoy spending time with their child and participating in community activism in the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe peoples (Niagara, ON). 

Brianna Urquhart

Brianna is a Registered Social Worker currently working in mental health. She is currently completing her Master’s of Social Work (MSW) at the University of Waterloo and holds an (Hon.) Bachelor’s Social Work & Disability Studies. Her research interests include the mental and sexual health, lived experiences, and identities of people with disabilities.

Manlin (Monica) Cai

Manlin (Monica) Cai is a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology at the University of British Columbia. Her research interests center around family, gender, and immigration in China and Canada. She is particularly interested in how gender intersects with family dynamics under the broader social, cultural, and institutional contexts. She works with Prof. Sylvia Fuller and Prof. Yue Qian to examine how the COVID-19 pandemic affects the Canadian families in the labor market and how these effects may inform family policies.

Megan Coghill

Megan Coghill (BASc., RECE) is completing her Master of Science in Family Relations and Human Development at the University of Guelph. Her research interests include early childhood education, nature-based pedagogy, observational methods, and student parents. Megan is conducting a scoping review about the institutional and jurisdictional policies and practices that impact student parents who are enrolled in post-secondary institutions in Canada. The scoping review will address the barriers that student parents face, available supports, and the unique strengths of student parents and their families.

Jessica Falk

Beginning in 2018, Jessica Falk has participated in two projects on Indigenous practices of care work and paid work with Dr. Eva Jewell, Dr. Doucet, and the Fort Erie Native Friendship Centre. She will build on this research background in this Partnership research program. Jessica earned her Master of Arts in Social Justice and Equity Studies at Brock University. Her research focused on Canadian nationalism, masculinity, and racism in Canadian hockey culture. She carries this expertise forward as she completes her Master of Science in Education at Niagara University.

Alyssa Gerhardt

Alyssa Gerhardt is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at Dalhousie University. She specializes in economic sociology, studying personal debt in Atlantic Canada using a mixed-method approach. Alyssa has been involved in several different projects with the Rural Futures Research Centre at Dalhousie, including a regional study on work, income, and community. Recently she co-authored Canada’s Food Price Report 2021, a national report that forecasts food prices and examines food trends. Alyssa is a recipient of the Nova Scotia Graduate Scholarship and the Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship, awarded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

Trina McKellep

Trina McKellep is working on a Master of Arts degree at the University of Manitoba in the Sociology and Criminology department. Growing up and working in Northern Manitoba instilled a sense of community and underpins her research interests with Indigenous communities. Her educational and work experiences are social justice oriented, working for organizations such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Kanikanichik, and the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation. She hopes to continue to work with organizations that fight for both social justice and meaningful climate change.

Rachel McLay

Rachel McLay is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at Dalhousie University. As a research associate with the Rural Futures Research Centre, she has conducted and analyzed several surveys on political, socio-cultural, and environmental change in Atlantic Canada. She has also studied the experiences of childhood immigrants and refugees for the Child and Youth Refugee Research Coalition. An advocate for public sociology, she does research and writing that engages with public audiences and aims to influence policymakers. Her SSHRC-funded doctoral research is focused on political culture and change in Atlantic Canada.

Siqi (Rebecca) Qin

Siqi (Rebecca) Qin is a M.A. student at the Department of Sociology at University of British Columbia. She holds a B.A. in Sociology from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her research interests centre around health, gender, and social inequality. Her dissertation investigates the patient-therapist relationship in mental health services in China. As a research assistant to Dr. Sylvia Fuller, she assisted in the making and piloting of the Familydemic Questionnaire.

Kenya Thompson

Kenya Thompson is an advocate, writer, researcher, and MA candidate at Carleton University’s Institute of Political Economy. Her research interests include social reproduction, unpaid domestic labour, time use, social policy, and the politics of mother/parenthood. She is currently working as a research assistant to Dr. Doucet and Dr. Lindsey McKay providing research support and conducting an international environmental scan of mixed benefit approaches to parental leave.  

Helena Tizza

Helena Tizaa is a continuing Master of Critical Sociology student at Brock University.

She has a Honours BA in Sociology from the University of Ghana.  She is an aspiring social science researcher and hopes to  inform policy interventions through research to make a difference in the lives of people like her. Her research focuses on making a difference in the lives of marginalized people, particularly Black women. She currently works as a teaching and research assistant  in the Department of Sociology at Brock University. She has conducted research that investigates the experiences of Ghanaian women engaged in commercial sex work and has also taken part in research that investigates the experiences of marginalized international students in Canada. Her major research project, which is currently underway, examines how the Structural Adjustment Policies of the IMF and World Bank exacerbate maternal health conditions in Ghana, including malnutrition, maternal and infant morbidity and mortality in women, and hypothesize these harms as criminal.

Kailin Rourke

Kailin Rourke graduated from Brock University in 2021 with an undergraduate degree of Political Science and Sociology, with a concentration in Public Law. She has experience working in administration for Long-Term Care, and her primary focus has been the realities of health care and their interaction with policies. 

Mireille Chaumont-Goneau

Suite à un baccalauréat en sociologie à l’Université de Montréal, je suis présentement étudiante à la maitrise en Études des populations à l’Institut national de la recherche scientifique sous la direction de Maude Pugliese. Mon projet de recherche porte sur la préparation financière à la retraite de parents ayant un enfant avec un handicap impliquant des incapacités à accomplir des tâches de la vie quotidienne et qui nécessite des soins particuliers. Je m’intéresse principalement aux inégalités économiques selon le genre et aux impacts de la division genrée des tâches au sein de l’unité parentale en fonction des rôles sociaux accordés à chacun. Au cours de mon parcours universitaire, j’ai eu la chance de travailler sur plusieurs projets stimulants concernant les inégalités de genre au sein de la famille.

Partners

Illustrations by Diana Tzinis
Translation by Jocelyne Tougas